Earnings Loss Benefits 2018-11-21T15:22:32+00:00

Earnings Loss Benefits 

Benefits – Annual Rates – 2018
Following a work injury, you may be eligible to receive earnings loss benefits and other allowances. To calculate the amount of earnings loss benefits you’ll receive, the WCB gets your employment earnings from your employer. Your earnings loss benefits are based on what you were earning when you were injured, up to a maximum insurable amount.

As directed by The Workers’ Compensation Act, 2013 (the Act), rates for minimum and maximum earnings loss and other allowances are adjusted annually and approved through Board policies and procedures. For further information, and previous year amounts, please refer to the Maximum Wage Rates procedure in the Policy & Procedure Manual.

Maximum Wage Rate
The Act states that the maximums are to be adjusted every year according to the percentage change in Saskatchewan’s average weekly wage as reported by Statistics Canada (Sections 37 and 182).

The Act references two maximum wage rates:

  • One for injuries that happened before January 1, 2014, and
  • A second one for injuries that happened after January 1, 2014.

 

What is the maximum wage rate for injuries that happened before January 1, 2014?

Effective Date Maximum Wage Rate
January 1, 2013 $55,000
January 1, 2014 $57,037
January 1, 2015 $58,941
January 1, 2016 $58,941
January 1, 2017 $59,127
January 1, 2018 $60,441
January 1, 2019 $62,038

Workers with an injury date prior to January 1, 2014 will qualify for the 2019 maximum of $62,038 at their annual benefit review date.

 

What is the maximum wage rate for injuries that happened on or after January 1, 2014?

Effective Date Maximum Wage Rate
January 1, 2014 $59,000
January 1, 2015 $65,130
January 1, 2016 $69,242
January 1, 2017 $76,086
January 1, 2018 $82,627
January 1, 2019 $88,314

Workers with an injury date on or after January 1, 2014 will qualify for their 2019 maximum of $88,314 at their annual benefit review date.

 

How are earnings loss benefits calculated?
Section 68 of the Act states if your injury happened on or after September 1, 1985, your earnings loss benefits will be 90 per cent of your employment earnings.

Gross employment earnings MINUS Probable deductions (CPP, EI, income tax) = Net employment earnings X 90% = Earnings loss benefits

Probable deductions will be based upon the information that the worker has authorized the employer to deduct from his/her employment earnings for income tax purposes and that is available as of the commencement of the loss of earnings.

If your injury happened before September 1, 1985, your earnings loss benefits will be 75 per cent of your gross employment earnings.

 

Will minimum compensation and the minimum average weekly earnings change?
Yes.

The minimum compensation for workers who are totally unable to work has increased to $514.65/week.

The minimum average weekly earnings for workers who have received benefits for at least 24 consecutive months has increased to $686.20/week.

 

What if I do not receive the minimum or maximum rate?
The Act requires the WCB to annually adjust benefits to keep up with changes in the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Your earnings loss benefits will be adjusted by the percentage increase in the CPI during your annual benefit review.

Effective Year CPI Increase
2018 3.9%
2017 0.1%
2016 2.1%
2015 2.1%
2014 1.3%

Rates for other allowances, such as burial, dependent children, clothing and personal care, are also adjusted annually by the CPI. See the Consumer Price Index (CPI) – Annual Increase procedure in the Policy & Procedure Manual for current amounts.

 

Do my CPP disability benefits affect my cheque?
Canada Pension Plan (CPP) provides disability benefits to people who have made enough contributions to the CPP and who are disabled and cannot work at any job on a regular basis. You may be entitled to both wage loss benefits under the Act and CPP disability benefits for the same period of entitlement for the same work injury.

If you are approved for CPP disability benefits, 50 per cent of these benefits are considered wages that you are capable of earning and are, therefore, used in calculating your wage loss starting on your first annual benefit review. Because the CPP disability benefits increase every year, you may see a decrease in your wage loss benefits.

If you have further questions, contact your case manager.